Archive for July 13th, 2013

AAAA stud hand, first four cards dealt

Posted July 13, 2013 By martin

 

AAAA

Great hand TB!!! [Ac] [Ah] [Ad] [As] [Kh]

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H.R.2666 – Internet Poker Freedom Act of 2013

Posted July 13, 2013 By martin

If passed, the Internet Poker Freedom Act will require all Internet poker facilities to go through a licensing process in order to be deemed legal operations.  In order to become licensed, an applicant must demonstrate that it maintains appropriate safeguards and mechanisms, including the ability restrict (to a reasonable degree of certainty) that participants are 21-years of age or older, physically located in a jurisdiction that has not prohibited such poker bets at the time they are placed, protected from having their personal information disclosed or disseminated and offered games that are fair and honest, which prevent cheating and the use of cheating devices (including software programs known as “bots”).  Failure to become licensed could result in the individuals associated with such facilities to be fined and/or receive up to five years in prison.  Licenses issued will be valid for five years upon receipt.

internet-poker-freedom-act-of-2013

view entire Internet Poker Freedom Act of 2013 bill here

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rivered royal flush

Posted July 13, 2013 By martin

[As][Ts]   [Js 7d Ks]   [6c]   [Qs]

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US Online poker site completes 30-day trial

Posted July 13, 2013 By martin


Ultimate Gaming.com, the first fully legal United States online gambling and poker website, has now received the recommendation of the Nevada Gaming Control Board to be fully approved by the state’s gaming commission. The iGaming market is booming everywhere and other states are looking to follow Nevada’s lead.

SBR reported on February 22 that Nevada made history by legalizing online poker. One week later, NJ Governor Christie signed an internet gambling bill for his state. Atlantic City is expected to have its internet games up and running near the end of the year.

Ultimate Gaming CEO Tobin Prior released the following statement on the news: “The Nevada Gaming Control Board has set regulatory requirements for online poker at the highest level. We are thrilled that our product is the first to not only meet these standards, but exceed them.”

If you’re thinking of anteing up, you’re going to have to be at least 18 years of age and physically present in the state of Nevada at the time. Many companies are spending significantly to recruit firms specializing in geo-location technology to ensure the strict licensing standards are met. SBR reported on one such company’s deal with Bwin.party earlier in the week.

Just years ago, the US seemed determined at a federal level to outlaw most forms of internet gambling. The states, on the other hand, are desperate to bring in more revenue through taxes. Internet gambling is just the beginning of the conversation with respect to the land of the free; across the country NJ is undergoing a federal battle for sportsbooks in Atlantic City that might end with the repeal of federal law PASPA (Professional and Amateur Sports Protection Act) – which could see states other than Sin City accepting wagers on sports games in the future.

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VB.NET vs C#

Posted July 13, 2013 By martin

Here in the real world where work actually gets done for actual monetary compensation, developers choose Visual Basic for one reason and one reason only: It’s the programming equivalent to the Leatherman Pocket Multitool. Visual Basic (for Applications) is employed in the MS Office Object Model (from Office 2000 up to and including the new 2012. Visual Basic (for Applications) is employed in the ArcGIS software suite API. VBA is embedded in dozens of other high-end and industry-specific software products for built-in extensibility as well. Visual Basic is employed in Windows Scripting Host (WSH/wscript) and the Command-Based Scripting Host (cscript), and VBScript is processed/executed in HTML markup by all webbrowsers worth having. In Legacy Visual Basic (6 and earlier) VB also exposed OOP, and in DotNET VB exposes OOP plus DotNET. The syntaxes, array functions, and other basic language behaviors are absolutely identical across these multiple and various platforms meaning that if you VB then you do all of the above. If you’re a Visual Basic developer, all of the above is right at your fingertips as long as you’re willing/able to learn the variant engine capabilities.

C# doesn’t offer half of this. In fact, C# only offers DotNET. C# is however, as others have mentioned, an internationally standardized syntax as opposed to a company proprietary language. C# also enjoys an avid following in non-DotNET circles, with multiple interpreters available for Linux/Unix; if you develop on DotNET with C# though, you’re as tied to Windows with DotNET as you would be with Visual Basic. There is a (allegedly functional) product called Mono to extend DotNET onto Linux/Mac platforms, but Mono sucks hard and loud; many proponents will screech that it’s VB that sucks and therefore the Mono project doesn’t support it as well as C#, but if you’ve ever actually tried to use Mono you’d have learnt really fast that System.Windows.Forms doesn’t work well in Mono in any language and System.Net.Security is almost entirely nonexistent (at least if you want/need to work with any SSL over 1.0 and/or use any crypto newer than 10 years old).

On the whole “$10,000.00 USD per year more for developing with C#” question, because the VB developer can literally do anything the C# developer can do and then a whole lot more, the VB developer gets to write his/her own ticket (very, very literally) when working with/for anybody who relies on Microsoft Products like Windows, MS Office, (and ESRI products, and other VBA-embedded products). The C# developer without any ability to do anything but prattle nonsense about how lowly and worthless VB skills are, on the other hand, literally can’t do anything but weigh in heavily on topics he/she knows little/nothing about and then say nasty things like, “I don’t know what you’re talking about and I don’t think you do either,” when they get called on it. So in the end, you should never, never, never select a programming language for any development based on which language is better than another; you should find a competent developer who can tell you his/her own reasons for preferring one language over the other and then let them do it their own way because that way you’ll get the best possible final product out of them.

 

entire thread on msdn forums

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